Peter Jackson Appears in ‘Hobbit’-Themed Air New Zealand Video


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Peter Jackson, Gollum and others make guest appearances in Air New Zealand’s latest in-flight safety video..

 

In preparation for the release of Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey Air New Zealand has something up its sleeve once again.

 

Elvin crew members instruct hobbits, dwarves, wizards and other creatures on in-flight safety in their new video, An Unexpected Briefing, which will run leading up to the worldwide release of The Hobbit beginning Wednesday.

 

Peter Jackson makes a cameo, as well as the digitally animated character Gollum — created by Weta Digital, Jackson’s digital effects company behind The Hobbit trilogy. Dean O’Gorman, who plays Fili the Dwarf in The Hobbit, and J.R.R. Tolkien’s great grandson, Royd, also make cameos in the video….

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5 Best Social Media Campaigns with User-Generated Content


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Ten years ago, the major advertisers had big budgets they spent on both media buying and the creation of content…

 

The Best Job in the World

 

Much like most people can tell you exactly where they were when they heard major news events, I can tell you exactly what I was doing when I first stumbled across the brilliant Best Job in the World Campaign back in 2009.

 

The amazingly viral, and at the time, inventive, publicity stunt offered a ‘job’ as an island caretaker in the #Great Barrier Reefwith a salary of AUD $150,000 for a six-month stint. It helped that the campaign was rolled out in January, where people in many parts of the Northern Hemisphere were in the depths of winter (making those Australian Beaches seem that much more appealing).

The campaign went insanely viral and solicited 34,000 user-submitted videos and applications total. The entire campaign was user generated and encouraged engagement. A shortlist was created from the 34,00 submissions, and then a wildcard candidate was crowdsourced. It was an inexpensive, clever idea that ended up being incredible successful, viral campaign with a huge ROI….

 

See on www.postano.com

Friends with benefits: Nescafé Philippines case study for FB


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Like CRM (customer relations management), creating a brand presence on Facebook is a long-term commitment. Once the Wall is open updates must be made regularly and someone must answer fan comments, queries and complaints.. 

 

In our experience handling over twenty of the Philippines’ most successful Facebook pages, we’ve learned that it takes consistency and persistence to acquire FANS and generate PARTICIPATION. But done right, this turns an active fanbase into AMBASSADORS who can influence BUSINESS.

Level 1: Fans

Anyone who has been here will tell you that Filipinos are the friendliest people in the world. Our large families and extensive relationship networks have made us natural socializers. It is no wonder then that social networks became an immediate hit as early as a decade ago with the launch of Friendster then Multiply.

Today, Facebook is king, not only among social networks but in the Philippine digital landscape. Of the 10 most visited websites in the country in Q4 2011, Facebook received 75 percent of PH traffic.

Our social nature has organically extended to brands, whom Filipinos are happy to connect with on Facebook. According to Universal McCann’s Wave 5 (Social Media Tracker) 66 percent have joined a brand community online (vs. 47 percent globally)….

See on business.inquirer.net

Disney’s bought Star Wars? Buckle up! Fans will be the Wild Card!


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I just realized this morning that not only has Disney acquired Star Wars, Disney has also now entered into a relationship with one of the most active, devoted & proprietorial fan communities on the planet. As my sister (mother of two boys & wife of a 40 year old Star Wars die-hard fan) told me, ‘You out grow Sponge Bob. You don’t outgrow Star Wars.’

 

Now how exactly will Disney deal with the proliferation of fan-made content, remixing, rewriting & generally messing around in the Star Wars story world? Lucas’ relationship with fans & fan-made content has a long & varied history. Henry Jenkins has written about this extensively (2006), as has Lawrence Lessig (2008). In a recent essay for Linda Hutcheon’s A Theory of Adaptation 2nd Edition on the impact of digital media on adaptation (product & practices), I wrote about Casey Pugh’s crowdsourced remake of Star Wars, viewable on YouTube, which in our Web 2.0 era, lives happily on the web and hasn’t been locked in a vault as was the 1980s fan remake of Raiders of the Lost Ark, Raiders: The Adaptation. I post an excerpt here as I will be watching in fascination to see how the future of Star Wars unfolds….

See on transmediacamp101.wordpress.com

Disney’s bought Star Wars? Buckle up! Fans will be the Wild Card!


I just realized this morning that not only has Disney acquired Star Wars, Disney has also now entered into a relationship with one of the most active, devoted & proprietorial fan communities on the planet.  As my sister (mother of two boys & wife of a 40 year old Star Wars die-hard fan) told me, ‘You out grow Sponge Bob. You don’t outgrow Star Wars.’

Now how exactly will Disney deal with the proliferation of fan-made content, remixing, rewriting & generally messing around in the Star Wars story world? Lucas’ relationship with fans & fan-made content has a long & varied history. Henry Jenkins has written about this extensively (2006), as has Lawrence Lessig (2008). In a recent essay for Linda Hutcheon’s A Theory of Adaptation 2nd Edition on the impact of digital media on adaptation (product & practices), I wrote about Casey Pugh’s crowdsourced remake of Star Wars, viewable on YouTube, which in our Web 2.0 era, lives happily on the web and hasn’t been locked in a vault as was the 1980s fan remake of Raiders of the Lost Ark, Raiders: The Adaptation. I post an excerpt here as I will be watching in fascination to see how the future of Star Wars unfolds.

Given that LucasFilm had JUST announced (Oct. 23 2012) a partnership with Casey Pugh to remake The Empire Strikes Back as a fan remake again in 15 second scenes, I’m totally intrigued.

“…In July 2009, Casey Pugh invited a global audience to help remake the original Star Wars Episode IV: The New Hope in the form of 473 15-second clips to be posted to the film adaptation’s website (http://www.starwarsuncut.com/). Pugh’s project was not the first shot-by- shot remake of Star Wars: The New Hope, for Toy Wars (2002) remade the film with movie action figures (Jenkins 2006: 147). Fans from roughly 20 countries remade clips in a wide range of styles, including live action, multiple styles of animation and anime, puppets, LEGO, grindhouse, Yellow Submarine-style, stop motion, and the list goes on. There was no attempt at continuity in style, location, or actors and as multiple versions were uploaded for individual clips, fans voted on what version would make the final cut. The result is a glorious, hilarious testimony to fan devotion and enthusiasm for playing with the “original” content, and to adaptation as an act of communal ownership of a story deeply embedded in the consciousnesses of multiple generations across the globe. Pugh’s crowdsourced adaptation, “an official, perfectly imperfect shadow version of the original film” (Lloyd 2010), was posted live online as Star Wars Uncut in August 2010, and then went on to receive an Emmy for “outstanding creative achievement in interactive media” (Stelter 2010). Although restricted by an NDA, Pugh has stated that Lucasfilm supports the project and there appears to be the potential for future cinema release. The film can be viewed in full on YouTube and on the website

What the easy accessibility of Pugh and his collaborators’ adaptation demonstrates is that media conglomerates no longer own the channels of production and distribution in the way that they did in the last century. Further, control of IP and thus adaptation is no longer a straight- forward legal cease and desist affair, leading to prosecution. Instead, fans can and do mobilize in response to what they perceive as betrayals of their loyalty. Unlike Raiders: The Adaptation, Star Wars Uncut was made in the very public space of the internet; production and editing were crowdsourced, meaning that the community was interconnected throughout the process. Pugh intentionally took advantage of the connectivity of the web to create an aggregate work that is the logical extension of fan-generated content posted on YouTube since its 2005 launch. The connectivity of the net has circumvented what fifteen years ago would have been a cease and desist action against copyright infringement. What Star Wars Uncut has achieved is a middle ground between what Grant McCracken (2010) defines as the economies of scarcity and plenitude. In the first, the corporation retains complete control (he cites Disney), believing value and revenue depend on the scarcity of content, and in the second, corporations realize they “have a right to retain copyright but they have an interest in releasing it” ( McCracken 2010; quoted in Jenkins 2006: 158)….”

See  the LucasFilm announcement here

Good Luck Disney! Fans???? George Lucas: I Sold Lucasfilm To Disney To ‘Protect It’ | TechCrunch


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Though it’s obviously more of a show business story than it is a technology industry story, the news of Lucasfilm’s $4 billion sale to Disney has reverberated throughout the tech world this afternoon.

 

To feed some of the curiosity surrounding the deal, StarWars.com just released a short video in which George Lucas and Lucasfilm’s co-chairman Kathleen Kennedy explain some of the logic behind the sale to Disney.

 

You can watch the whole thing embedded above, but from a business perspective, perhaps the most interesting thing is the level of optimism Lucas exhibits for how the company he has built over the past 35 years will live on inside of its new parent company:

 

“I felt that I really wanted to put the company somewhere in a larger entity which could protect it. Disney is a huge corporation. They have all kinds of capabilities and facilities, so that there’s a lot of strength that is gained by this.

 

…I’m doing this so that the films will have a longer life, and so that more fans and people can enjoy them in the future. It’s a very big universe I’ve created and there are a lot of stories that are sitting in there.”…

See on techcrunch.com

Early Bird Rate Until Nov. 1! Have you looked at the Schedule? Fantastic Full Day Masterclass with Jon Reiss | Transmedia 101


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Transmedia 101 presents Jon Reiss: Think Outside the Box Office…

 

Jon Reiss’ approach is a practical, step by step guide to create a unique distribution and marketing strategy for your film. During the master class participants will learn:

 

Goal Assessment
Audience Identification
Ways to connect with and build an audience for your work.
Social media, organizational partnership and crowdfunding essentials.
How to create a robust Live Event/Theatrical release.
How to create merchandise that audiences will want to buy.
A new approach to conceptualizing digital rights and their monetization.
How to coordinate the timing of their various rights & marketing strategies.
How to integrate the exciting new world of transmedia into their work.
What is a Producer of Marketing and Distribution & how they can help you.

You can now download the schedule on our site:

 

http://transmedia-101.com/transmedia-101-masterclass-with-jon-reiss/

 

See on transmedia-101.com